Writer’s Block Caused By Stress: Ten Ways To Overcome.

I hope everyone had a fabulous time at the WD Conference this weekend. I know you learned a lot, and met some pretty awesome people. I’m sure some of you are already hard at work, critiquing, editing, and rewriting some of your manuscript, just from what you learned at the conference. Good job! Keep those words flowing!

However, a few might be a little overwhelmed, and I know at times for me, it can cause major writer’s block. Don’t get stressed! There are plenty of tips and info out there that may help relieve your writer’s block. This article here, in particular, really helped me. If you’re feeling a tad anxious or stressed from the work you know you have ahead of you, this article by, The Creative Writer’s Desk, can perhaps benefit you as well.

Some of these tips I may have touched on before, but let’s be honest, it’s never a bad idea for a review. Also, check out these great quotes by other authors, on how they combat the dreaded writer’s block – http://writerscircle.com/quotes-to-combat-writers-block/


Stress is one of the top two causes of writer’s block. When your mind is preoccupied it’s difficult, sometimes impossible to focus on creative writing. There are ways to get around it. Sometimes writing can actually be the activity that relieves your stress. Try these techniques to help you to relax and let the words flow. The top 10 ways to beat stress related writer’s block.

1. Designate one place that’s just for writing. It may seem like a simple task but if there is one place that you write every day it makes it easier for your mind to focus on writing and writer’s block won’t be as big of a problem. It’s the same concept as studying in the classroom where you have a test. You’re accustom to the surroundings so when you sit down in that area your mind recognizes that it’s time to write and it will more easily put aside the other worries of the day.

2. Write at least 500 words immediately after you wake up. The morning is when your mind is most rested and relaxed. The act of writing is, psychologically speaking, both soothing and stimulating. It sooths the mind by acting as an outlet for the stress you wake up with, allowing you to face your day with less on your mind. It’s stimulating because it gets your creative juices flowing, like mental pushups. By starting your day with writing, you’ll be facing the world with a creative mindset.

3. Give yourself enough time. Consider writing a prior engagement. If you’re serious about being a writer you have to give yourself enough time to work. Think of it as a relationship. You’ve promised writing that you’re going to devote the 5 o’clock hour to it. It’s a date. If you have to pick up the kids or go to class, pick a different time to write. You can’t write if you rush yourself. It will only add more stress and make the writer’s block worse.

4. Eliminate distractions. It sounds easy but in the world of cell phones and e-mail, it isn’t. Turn off your cell phone, disconnect your Internet or turn your wireless off, and put a “do not disturb” sign on the door. A woman I know has a sign that she puts on her door while writing that says, “If you aren’t bleeding, I don’t care.” Get rid of the clutter in your writing space and keep it that way. Your task is writing. Stick to it.

5. Keep a Journal. This is one of the classic tips of stress relief but how can writing help you with writer’s block? Writing a personal journal and creative writing for an audience are two different tasks. Put pen to paper with your problems in mind and you’ll be surprised what comes out. Sometimes there were stressors in your life that you weren’t even thinking about. Seeing these things in writing sometimes helps you to figure out solutions. Even when it doesn’t, it feels good just to have them written down.

6. Take a power nap. Most working adults and students aren’t getting enough sleep. This can lead to decreased focus and increased stress by 3 or 4 in the afternoon. There are studies that show a 20-minute nap in the afternoon provides more rest than 20 more minutes of sleep in the morning. The equation is simple: more sleep equals less stress equals better focus when writing.

7. You can only change yourself. If there is someone else who doesn’t like you, or your work, there isn’t anything you can do about it. Don’t let other people’s judgments of you affect your judgment of yourself. If your writing isn’t good enough for someone else, but it’s the best your capable of doing, then it’s their problem. It’s easier to say than do but you can learn to see past their opinions. When someone tells you something that sounds negative don’t immediately respond. Repeat their words in your head and ask yourself, is this constructive criticism or destructive criticism? If it’s constructive, consider their advice and ask questions. If it’s destructive, smile at them and thank them for their opinion. Watching how annoyed they get when you don’t seem hurt is often humorous in itself (also a technique for relieving stress).

8. Exercise. Take a walk. Do yoga. Dancercise. Whatever will get your blood moving will get more oxygen to your brain and allow you to think more clearly. You’ll feel better about yourself because exercise is productive and healthy and you’ll feel better about writing when you get to it.

9. Take a break. Unless you’re on a strict deadline, whatever project you’re working on can wait. Sometimes, feeling trapped into one project can be stressful enough to cause writer’s block. If you’re working on a novel, put it to the side for a few days and try a short story or an essay. The change of pace is sometimes a relief and your mind will probably continue to work on the larger project behind the scenes. In a day or two you’ll wake up with a brilliant new direction so keep a notebook ready.

10. Volunteer. If you have the time, and be honest with yourself about the time you actually have, spend some of it helping others. Volunteer at a hospital, library, school, or community center. The feeling that you’re helping others is a simple way to overcoming stress and writer’s block. As human beings we’re naturally very self-focused. By getting out and helping others it allows us to see that our problems aren’t the only problems in the world. For writers, volunteering also adds to the material and experiences that we later turn into creative writing. Win-win-win.


I would so so so love to hear about how everyone did at the conference and what they thought about it. Feel free to comment or message me on here, or any of my social media sites! Thanks again for reading, and of course, writing!!!

Happy Writing Ya’ll!!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s